THIS WEEKS ALL WEATHER FIXTURES - 26th March KEMPTON PARK- 27th March WOLVERHAMPTON- 29th March WOLVERHAMPTON - 30th March LINGFIELD PARK, KEMPTON PARK & SOUTHWELL - 31st March WOLVERHAMPTON & CHELMSFORD CITY - 1ST aPRIL LINGFIELD PARK & WOLVERHAMPTON - 2nd April KEMPTON PARK -

Australian Horse Racing Scandal: In need of a purge


Horse Racing scandals have been around since the chariot contests of ancient Rome, but it is now time for a purge.
Several leading jockeys - including Damien Oliver, the subject of the film The Cup - are under investigation for betting on races that they competed in.
Oliver is alleged to have placed a $10,000 bet on a rival horse in 2010.
Leading businessman Lloyd Williams, founder of Melbourne's Crown Casino, wasted no time in dumping Oliver from his Cox Plate ride on his horse Green Moon.
Jockey Damien Oliver alleged to have placed a $10,000 bet on a rival horse
Even the whiff of illegality causes ripples in a sport which attracts every level of society and is funded by the punt.
Mountains of money and human frailty are a toxic mix and the temptation can prove too much for some.
Jockeys are banned from betting on races and giving tips to others - but they do.
The difference these days is that bookmakers must reveal betting records of punters when requested.
The latest betting revelations come on top of jockey Danny Nikolic being suspended for two years for abusing and threatening Victoria's chief steward, Terry Bailey.
Nikolic has been headline news since his former father-in-law and horse trader, Les Samba, was gunned down in Melbourne last year. The crime, believed to be intrinsically linked to horse racing, remains unsolved.
Racing has always attracted a colourful "criminal" element.
Gangsters tried to shoot dead Phar Lap the day before he won the 1930 Melbourne Cup and raging Cup favourite Big Philou was "nobbled" before the 1969 race.
Just a few months ago, Black Caviar's string of successes had racing at the forefront of good news stories, but now the sport is in danger of damaging its image beyond repair.
One only has to look at cycling to see a sport battling for credibility and relevance.
It is an indication of racing's intent to face up to the issue that the latest revelations have been brought into the open during the spring carnival and have not been hushed up until after the Melbourne Cup.
Participants in racing must follow the rules - and should be banned for life if they are not prepared to. It is the only way to protect the image of the sport enjoyed by millions, but corrupted by a few.

Horse Racing Tips: 14-1 or 13-2?

Monday, October 15, 2012

Australian Horse Racing Scandal: In need of a purge


Horse Racing scandals have been around since the chariot contests of ancient Rome, but it is now time for a purge.
Several leading jockeys - including Damien Oliver, the subject of the film The Cup - are under investigation for betting on races that they competed in.
Oliver is alleged to have placed a $10,000 bet on a rival horse in 2010.
Leading businessman Lloyd Williams, founder of Melbourne's Crown Casino, wasted no time in dumping Oliver from his Cox Plate ride on his horse Green Moon.
Jockey Damien Oliver alleged to have placed a $10,000 bet on a rival horse
Even the whiff of illegality causes ripples in a sport which attracts every level of society and is funded by the punt.
Mountains of money and human frailty are a toxic mix and the temptation can prove too much for some.
Jockeys are banned from betting on races and giving tips to others - but they do.
The difference these days is that bookmakers must reveal betting records of punters when requested.
The latest betting revelations come on top of jockey Danny Nikolic being suspended for two years for abusing and threatening Victoria's chief steward, Terry Bailey.
Nikolic has been headline news since his former father-in-law and horse trader, Les Samba, was gunned down in Melbourne last year. The crime, believed to be intrinsically linked to horse racing, remains unsolved.
Racing has always attracted a colourful "criminal" element.
Gangsters tried to shoot dead Phar Lap the day before he won the 1930 Melbourne Cup and raging Cup favourite Big Philou was "nobbled" before the 1969 race.
Just a few months ago, Black Caviar's string of successes had racing at the forefront of good news stories, but now the sport is in danger of damaging its image beyond repair.
One only has to look at cycling to see a sport battling for credibility and relevance.
It is an indication of racing's intent to face up to the issue that the latest revelations have been brought into the open during the spring carnival and have not been hushed up until after the Melbourne Cup.
Participants in racing must follow the rules - and should be banned for life if they are not prepared to. It is the only way to protect the image of the sport enjoyed by millions, but corrupted by a few.